07/18/2014 – 07/24/2014

Friday, July 18

The-Raid_02

THE RAID: REDEMPTION    7PM    At Brattle Theatre. 40 Brattle Street, Cambridge MA 02138    2011    101 mins.    35mm

“Bullets, fists, and blades all fly, captured by Evans via a constantly moving, frequently gravity-defying camera. The emphasis here is speed: The fight choreography is blisteringly quick, designed to make viewers gasp, and then cheer.” – Noel Murray, The A.V. Club

 

THE RAID 2    4PM & 9:15PM    At Brattle Theatre. 40 Brattle Street, Cambridge MA 02138    2014    150 mins.    35mm

“The go-for-broke, more-is-more aesthetic becomes dizzying, and the film’s suspense comes not from the creaky storyline, but instead wondering how it’s going to top itself next.” – Sean Burns, TechnologyTell

 

METROPOLIS    7PM    At Harvard Film Archive. 24 Quincy Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1927    150 mins.    Digital Video

“One of the last examples of the imaginative – but often monstrous – grandeur of the Golden Period of the German film, Metropolis is a spectacular example of Expressionist design, with moments of almost incredible beauty and power, absurd ineptitudes, and oddities that defy analysis. It’s a wonderful, stupefying folly.” – Pauline Kael, The New Yorker

 

THE DEVILS    11:59PM    At Coolidge Corner Theatre. 290 Harvard Street, Brookline MA 02446    1971    108 mins.    35mm

“The funniest thing about this 1971 Ken Russell camp epic is probably the juxtaposition of its first-class production values (a good cast, great set design, marvelous photography) with Russell’s no-class sexual fantasies—it’s like a David Lean remake of Pink Flamingos.” – Dave Kehr, The Chicago Reader

 

HAROLD AND MAUDE    11:59PM    At Somerville Theatre. 55 Davis Square, Somerville MA 02144    1971    91 mins.    35mm

“There’s no Us versus Them dynamic in Higgins’s script or Ashby’s direction, just a crazy quilt of experience. That every major character save Harold and Maude seems content to exist within a little subjective square, butting up against others’ without merging, makes the film more sneakily radical than others in a countercultural vein.” – Matt Zoller Seitz, The Criterion Collection

 

Saturday, July 19

fritzlang-thebigheat1953-7

THE BIG HEAT    7PM    At Harvard Film Archive. 24 Quincy Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1953    90 mins.    35mm 

“As deceptive and two-faced as anything Lang ever made, with its sunny domestic tranquility precariously separated from a world of violence.” – Roger Ebert, Chicago Sun-Times

 

MINISTRY OF FEAR    9PM    At Harvard Film Archive. 24 Quincy Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1944    84 mins.    35mm 

“Mr. Lang has given the picture something of the chilling quality of some of his early German shockers—a strangely arch and maniacal surge that comes through suggestive use of camera and morbid pace in more critical spots.” – Bosley Crowther, The New York Times

 

DARK CITY    11:30PM    At Brattle Theatre. 40 Brattle Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1998    100 mins.    35mm

“But the complicated plot and the important themes are no more than window dressing; what counts here is the show, the creation of a strange world by a filmmaker who clearly knows science fiction and fantasy, past and present, and wants to share his love for it. Proyas succeeds in doing that, and his enthusiasm is infectious. Before the film is half over he manages to evoke memories of Blade Runner, Burton’s BatmanMetropolis, and assorted images from Cronenberg and Gilliam.” – Walter Addiego, San Francisco Examiner

 

THE RAID    1PM & 6:15PM    At Brattle Theatre. 40 Brattle Street, Cambridge MA 02138    2011    101 mins.    35mm

See above.

 

THE RAID 2    3:15PM & 8:30PM    At Brattle Theatre. 40 Brattle Street, Cambridge MA 02138    2014    150 mins.    35mm

See above.

 

THE DEVILS    11:59PM    At Coolidge Corner Theatre. 290 Harvard Street, Brookline MA 02446    1971    108 mins.    35mm

See above.

 

HAROLD AND MAUDE    11:59PM    At Somerville Theatre. 55 Davis Square, Somerville MA 02144    1971    91 mins.    35mm

See above. 

 

Sunday, July 20

vlcsnap-00058

THE TIGER OF ESCHNAPUR    5PM    At Harvard Film Archive. 24 Quincy Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1959    97 mins.    35mm 

“Throughout, Lang constantly endeavors to beguile and delight the eye, to inspire the viewer with a sense of wonderment – ‘childlike’ wonderment, if you prefer, though the grand, harmonious symmetry of the film’s design could only be the result of a lifetime’s diligent artistic practice.” – Nick Pinkerton, The Village Voice

 

THE INDIAN TOMB    7PM    At Harvard Film Archive. 24 Quincy Street, Cambridge MA 02138     1959    101 mins.    35mm

“The trancelike pleasure of the storytelling, in fact, is quite majestic – and these unique films could even be felt to resemble late Shakespearean romance in their shrugging off of worries about realistic plausibility and Lang’s profound reversion to the roots of creativity.” – Philip Horne, The Telegraph

 

THE RAID    1PM    At Brattle Theatre. 40 Brattle Street, Cambridge MA 02138    2011    101 mins.    35mm

See above.

 

THE RAID 2    3:15PM    At Brattle Theatre. 40 Brattle Street, Cambridge MA 02138    2011    150 mins.    35mm

See above.

 

Monday, July 21

set-up1

THE SET-UP    5PM    At Brattle Theatre. 40 Brattle Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1949    73 mins.    35mm

“I’ve seen this film’s influences in numerous others: The brutal, alley-way destruction of the tool of Stoker’s trade has a companion piece in Mo’ Better Blues. Both boxers go down, just like in Rocky (or was it Rocky II?). The boxer who refuses to throw the fight and faces down the wrath of a scorned bookie has been done to death, but here it made me think of Pulp Fiction.” – Odie Henderson, The House Next Door

 

BORN TO KILL    3PM    At Brattle Theatre. 40 Brattle Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1947    92 mins.    35mm

“Wise swims in the [noir] genre’s amorality, scoring a kitchen brawl to big-band radio tunes, terrorizing a soused matron at a nocturnal beach skirmish, and leaving the last word to Walter Slezak’s jovially corrupt detective.” – Fernando F. Croce, Slant Magazine

 

THE WIZARD OF OZ    7PM    At Coolidge Corner Theatre. 290 Harvard Street, Brookline MA 02446    1939    102 mins.    TBA

“Years later, I can now see that the terror instilled in me as a child by repeated viewings of The Wizard of Oz drove me to become a film critic. Was I the only one who had nightmares about  the Winged Monkeys, their formations filling the sky like a cross between Goya’s Sleep of Reason and the Luftwaffe? Or the appalling realization that one’s entire experience, in living color yet, might be no more than a dream?” – Peter Keough, The Boston Phoenix

 

HARAKIRI    7PM    At Harvard Film Archive. 24 Quincy Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1919    80 mins.    35mm

“Leaden-paced, adequately acted and hobbled by a European cast that never convincingly appears Asian, Harakiri exists mostly as a curiosity. Lang’s direction is pretty stodgy overall, but there are a few stylized, thoughtfully done shots which seem to indicate that he was attempting to capture some of the visual simplicity of Japanese print artists like Hiroshige.” – Matt Hinrichs, DVD Talk 

 

Tuesday, July 22

BORN_TO_KILL-7

BORN TO KILL    3:45PM & 7:30PM    At Brattle Theatre. 40 Brattle Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1947    92 mins.    35mm

See above.

 

THE SET-UP    5:45PM & 9:30PM    At Brattle Theatre. 40 Brattle Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1949    73 mins.    35mm

See above.

 

Wednesday, July 23

Stacey Dash And Alicia Silverstone In 'Clueless'

CLUELESS    3:30PM, 5:30PM, 7:30PM & 9:30PM    At Brattle Theatre. 40 Brattle Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1995    97 mins.    DCP        

“Part of what I love about Clueless is that for a movie about a precocious 15-year-old know-it-all, it’s remarkably non-judgmental; it rations sympathy across the social spectrum. There are no real heroes or villains(With the possible exception of Elton, who’s more a typically horny teenage jerk than a proper heavy.) The characters are just a bunch of folks honestly trying to navigate the incredibly complicated ecosystem of high school (both teenaged and adult), and for the most part failing honorably.” – Nathan Rabin, The Dissolve 

 

A SUMMER’S TALE    8PM    At Museum of Fine Arts. 465 Huntington Avenue, Boston MA 02115    1996    114 mins.    DCP

“Having a heretofore-unseen work by Rohmer in a movie theatre is as salutary as basking in a ray of June sunshine. Like many of his later pictures, this is a story of the romantic foibles of some attractive, self-conscious, but hardly self-aware young adults. Rohmer had an almost uncanny knack for using the mercurial predilections of the young as a launching pad for smart but not oppressive philosophical observations.” – Glenn Kenny, RogerEbert.com

 

Thursday, July 24

1383560119_only_lovers_left_alive-oo3

ONLY LOVERS LEFT ALIVE    7PM    At Brattle Theatre. 40 Brattle Street, Cambridge MA 02138    2014    123 mins.    35mm        

“Following Wes Anderson’s The Grand Budapest Hotel, the second-most-intensely curated movie of the season, starting with its first images, in which a galaxy of stars morphs into the spinning, gleaming groove of a vintage rock 45 on a turntable. The rest of the movie only deepens the mystical sense of the cosmos condensed into the well-chosen work of art – and the vintage fetish object that embodies it.” – Richard Brody, The New Yorker

 

UNDER THE SKIN    4:45PM & 9:30PM    At Brattle Theatre. 40 Brattle Street, Cambridge MA 02138    2014    108 mins.    DCP

“Glazer creates an anthropological study of human behavior as seen from the eyes of something inhuman. It’s not a profound concept, but it’s a visually invigorating one, one that dramatizes the smallness of our behaviors and our concerns. Many frames watch faceless individuals, surrounded by brand logos and retail outlets, criss-cross among each other, running to-and-fro across city streets.” – Jake Mulligan, Movie Mezzanine

07/11/2014 – 07/17/2014

FRIDAY, JULY 11

STOP-MAKING-SENSE

STOP MAKING SENSE    5PM & 7:30PM    At Brattle Theatre. 40 Brattle Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1984    100 mins.    DCP

“Part aerobics workout, part self-styled dreamscape, Stop Making Sense is a hyperactive piece of performance art that begins as the stripped-down dress rehearsal of a garage band and builds into a mighty, exhausting spectacle that shakes as much ass as it kicks. Then there’s Byrne. He’s a convulsive Donald O’Connor recast as that lone white boy in the black choir overcome with The Spirit. It’s still not hard to catch it, too.” – Wesley Morris, San Francisco Examiner

 

SCANNERS    11:59PM    At Coolidge Corner Theatre. 290 Harvard Street, Brookline MA 02446    1981    103 mins.   35mm

“One of the most technically proficient of David Cronenberg’s early gnawing, Canadian-made horror movies. The premise is vague but suggestive, and it’s developed with a creepy psychological resonance. Like Tod Browning, Cronenberg doesn’t have the stylistic resources to match the forcefulness of his ideas, but his movies remain in the mind for the pull of their private obsessions.” – Dave Kehr, Chicago Reader

 

THE PRINCESS BRIDE    11:59PM    At Kendall Square Cinema. 1 Kendall Square, Cambridge MA 02139    1987    100 mins.    Digital Video

“A full-length fairy tale full of fanciful characters, madcap adventures and a lot of other things surely not to every taste. But The Princess Bride has sweetness and sincerity on its side, and when it comes to fairy tales, those are major assets. It also has a delightful cast and a cheery, earnest style that turns out to be ever more disarming as the film moves along.” – Janet Maslin, The New York Times

 

SATURDAY, JULY 12

Willy Wonka

WILLY WONKA AND THE CHOCOLATE FACTORY    11:30AM    At Somerville Theatre. 55 Davis Square, Somerville MA 02144    1971    100 mins.    TBD

Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory is probably the best film of its sort since The Wizard of Oz. It is everything that family movies usually claim to be, but aren’t: Delightful, funny, scary, exciting, and, most of all, a genuine work of imagination. Willy Wonka is such a surely and wonderfully spun fantasy that it works on all kinds of minds and it is fascinating because, like all classic fantasy, it is fascinated with itself..” – Roger Ebert, Chicago Sun-Times

 

THE THIEF OF BAGDAD    11:30AM & 2:30PM    At Brattle Theatre. 40 Brattle Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1924    149 mins.    DCP

“But the greatest attraction in The Thief Of Bagdad remains Fairbanks himself. Fairbanks had the final authority on his United Artists films, and pushed for visual splendor and thrilling physicality over an excess of plotting and title cards. The best effect in The Thief Of Bagdad is Fairbanks’ lean, muscular physique, which he shows off while leaping and climbing at such great speed that he looks like a real-life superhero.” – Noel Murray, The A.V Club

 

SCANNERS    11:59PM    At Coolidge Corner Theatre. 290 Harvard Street, Brookline MA 02446    1981    103 mins.    35mm

See above.

 

THE PRINCESS BRIDE    11:59PM    At Kendall Square Cinema. 1 Kendall Square, Cambridge MA 02139    1987    100 mins.    Digital Video

See above.

 

SUNDAY, JULY 13

A Summer's Tale

A SUMMER’S TALE    1PM    At Museum of Fine Arts. 465 Huntington Avenue, Boston MA 02115    1996    113 mins.    TBD

“Having a heretofore-unseen work by Rohmer in a movie theatre is as salutary as basking in a ray of June sunshine. Like many of his later pictures, this is a story of the romantic foibles of some attractive, self-conscious, but hardly self-aware young adults. Rohmer had an almost uncanny knack for using the mercurial predilections of the young as a launching pad for smart but not oppressive philosophical observations.” – Glenn Kenny, RogerEbert.com

 

ORPHANS OF THE STORM    2PM    At Somerville Theatre. 55 Davis Square, Somerville MA 02144    1921    150 mins.    35mm

Orphans is gorgeous. Nobody did epic, teeming crowd scenes quite like Griffith, and there are precious few directors who ever conveyed the sweep of history with the same flair. Given Griffith’s overwritten intertitles, the Gish sisters do remarkably well as the orphans of the title. Lillian, of course, was a peerless artist who could pull at your heart like no other. Dorothy, as a blind girl forced to beg in the streets, probably has the better role for once.” – Farran Nehme, Self-Styled Siren

 

THE THREE AGES    12PM & 4:30PM    At Brattle Theatre. 40 Brattle Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1923    60mins.    35mm

“A romantic triangle is repeated thrice to illustrate the vicissitudes of courtship through the millenniums, and to give Buster Keaton a bigger canvas for his protean inventions. The intertwined chases in all three settings already point to Keaton’s knack for comic architecture, and there’s at least one magical shot — when the little caveman gets knocked into a pond, Keaton tumbles in slow-motion, blowing a kiss.” – Fernando F. Croce, CinePassion

 

INTOLERANCE    1:15PM & 6PM    At Brattle Theatre. 40 Brattle Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1916    170 mins.    DCP

“Weaving together four disparate storylines, all with the moral that intolerance is the cause of all human misery, Intolerance is almost 100 years old and is an extraordinary accomplishment, and far more than a curiosity, or just an artifact of cinema’s beginnings. It is a still-vibrant and exciting film, featuring awe-inspiring battle scenes as well as three-dimensional performances of great subtlety and emotional truth.” – Sheila O’Malley, Capital New York

 

MONDAY, JULY 14

Blazing Saddles

BLAZING SADDLES    7PM    At Coolidge Corner Theatre. 290 Harvard Street, Brookline MA 02446    1974    93 mins.   35mm

“I can recite the entire movie by heart, which explains a lot about my sense of humor. Black Bart is my hero, a black man in a racist white world who manages to get them to begrudgingly respect him. I can identify with that. I own 3 copies of it on DVD. I estimate I’ve seen it over 200 times, and I’ll probably be buried with a copy of it so I can laugh my ass off while burning in Hell.” – Odie Henderson, Movie Mezzanine

 

THE MAGNIFICENT AMBERSONS    5PM & 9:30PM    At Brattle Theatre. 40 Brattle Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1942    88 mins.    35mm

The Magnificent Ambersons is unusually somber for a Hollywood movie. What American secrets are being hidden here? The Amberson mansion is a miniature Xanadu, with Welles’s camera relentlessly craning up or prowling around its gloomy grand staircase. Filled with dark nostalgia for the artist’s Midwestern boyhood, Ambersons may be Welles’s most personal film.” – J. Hoberman, The Village Voice

 

CITIZEN KANE    7PM    At Brattle Theatre. 40 Brattle Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1941    119 mins.    35mm

“Even 60 years after its original release, Kane is still dazzlingly inventive, playing games with the structure of the medium few have had the courage or bravado to replicate. For all its over-the-top drama and twisted psychology (which Welles himself dismissed as “dollar-book Freud”), Kane is fundamentally a young man’s movie, full of the giddy exhilaration of a brash, supremely confident artist crossing into a brand-new medium.” – Sam Adams, Philadelphia City Paper

 

TUESDAY, JULY 15

Citizen Kane

CITIZEN KANE    7PM    At Brattle Theatre. 40 Brattle Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1941    119 mins.    35mm

See above.

 

THE MAGNIFICENT AMBERSONS    5PM & 9:30PM    At Brattle Theatre. 40 Brattle Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1942    88 mins.    35mm

See above.

06/27/2014 – 07/10/2014

FRIDAY, JUNE 27

Othello

OTHELLO    5:30PM, 7:30PM & 9:30PM    At Brattle Theatre. 40 Brattle Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1952    90 mins.    DCP

“This extraordinary picture, which it took more than three years to make and equally as long—or longer—to re-dub and prepare for showing here, is strictly an un-literate, inarticulate, and hotly impressionistic film, full of pictorial pyrotechnics and sinister, shadowy moods. Let’s be completely forthright about the talent revealed by Mr. Welles. It would be hard to improve upon this rendering of Othello for sheer mise-en-scène.” – Bosley Crowther, The New York Times

 

LAST YEAR AT MARIENBAD    7PM    At Harvard Film Archive. 24 Quincy Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1961    93 mins.    35mm

“One of the most influential movies ever made (as well as one of the most reviled), Marienbad is both utterly lucid and provocatively opaque—an elaborate joke on the world’s corniest pickup line and a drama of erotic fixation that takes Vertigo to the next level of abstraction. It’s a movie of alarming stasis—elegant zombies positioned like chess pieces in a hyper-civilized haunted house—and unsurpassed fluidity.” – J. Hoberman, The Village Voice

 

WILD GRASS    9PM    At Harvard Film Archive. 24 Quincy Street, Cambridge MA 02138    2009    104 mins.    35mm

“On one level, you have an old coot mucking about. Like the director’s previous Private Fears in Public Places, the colors are bizarre—oddball shades of blue and green. There’s little attempt at psychological continuity, with characters pulling behaviorial 180s and the actors left looking amusingly confused. And the finale hinges on someone’s inability to zip their fly. However jokily, Resnais is ruminating on pet themes.” – Matt Prigge, Philadelphia Weekly

 

THE TEXAS CHAINSAW MASSACRE    11:59PM    At Coolidge Corner Theatre. 290 Harvard Street, Brookline MA 02446    1974    84 mins.    DCP

“Hooper’s original film resists psychological analysis. The mysteriousness of the violence is underlined when Sally naively explains her interest in astrology: ‘Everything means something, I guess.’ The Texas Chainsaw Massacre‘s creators spend the entirety of their film’s lean 84-minute running time disproving Sally’s wishful thinking, dropping her into a nihilistic void in which violence is a pitilessly unexplainable fact of life.” – Simon Abrams, RogerEbert.com

 

RESERVOIR DOGS    11:59PM    At Kendall Square Cinema. 1 Kendall Square, Cambridge MA 02139    1992    99 mins.    Digital Video

“Director Quentin Tarantino’s debut may be the ultimate Boy Movie: It’s loaded with ultraviolence, wise-ass wit and poker-game bravado, and the lone female character is dead seconds after appearing. Reservoir Dogs is saved by a deep respect for pulp fiction that extends to the casting of B-movie vet Lawrence Tierney as the gang’s Mr. Big. You may not like the terms Tarantino sets, but you have to admit he succeeds on them.” – Ty Burr, Entertainment Weekly

 

SATURDAY, JUNE 28

Je Taime

JE T’AIME, JE T’AIME    9:30PM    At Harvard Film Archive. 24 Quincy Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1968    91 mins.    35mm

“Alain Resnais takes dozens of interludes from one man’s life — images of everyday banality and commonplace delights — and arranges them non-chronologically. Those leaps add up to a cubistic portrait of a not especially remarkable man who becomes something more, not because of his commonplace life but because of the extraordinary manner in which his story emerges in its sweep and details, its simplicity and grandeur.” – Manohla Dargis, The New York Times

 

MURIEL, OR THE TIME OF RETURN    7PM    At Harvard Film Archive. 24 Quincy Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1963    116 mins.    35mm

“Resnais has done a brilliant job of rendering the reality of a society without significant purpose. The sheer dailiness of an existence reduced to its diurnal dimension by the un-relatedness of longer time segments, the bitter memories of mediocrities, the brutal irrelevance of the Algerian War to the hopeless pettiness of the petit-bourgeoisie,  all are part of the continuing complexity in Muriel every time I see it.” – Andrew Sarris, The Village Voice

 

OTHELLO    1:30PM, 3:30PM, 5:30PM, 7:30PM & 9:30PM    At Brattle Theatre. 40 Brattle Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1952    90 mins.    DCP

See above.

 

THE TEXAS CHAINSAW MASSACRE    11:59PM    At Coolidge Corner Theatre. 290 Harvard Street, Brookline MA 02446    1974    84 mins.    DCP

See above.

 

RESERVOIR DOGS    11:59PM    At Kendall Square Cinema. 1 Kendall Square, Cambridge MA 02139    1992    99 mins.    Digital Video

See above.

 

SUNDAY, JUNE 29

Digital StillCamera

MY AMERICAN UNCLE    7PM    At Harvard Film Archive. 24 Quincy Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1980    125 mins.    35mm

“Resnais is only getting started. In scenes which play much better than they may sound, he uses humans dressed as giant white rats in reruns of key scenes from other angles. And Resnais uses Laborit’s narration to analyze other scenes. It begins to appear as if all three of these modern French citizens, from different social backgrounds, may have been acting on instructions beamed in from their vestigial brain centers.” – Roger Ebert, The Great Movies

 

JE T’AIME, JE T’AIME    5PM    At Harvard Film Archive. 24 Quincy Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1968    91 mins.    35mm

See above.

 

OTHELLO    1:30PM, 3:30PM, 5:30PM, 7:30PM & 9:30PM    At Brattle Theatre. 40 Brattle Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1952    90 mins.    DCP

See above.

 

MONDAY, JUNE 30

Ali Fear Eats The Soul

ALI: FEAR EATS THE SOUL     6PM    At Brattle Theatre. 40 Brattle Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1974    93 mins.    35mm

“Pure heartbreak, composed with a Sirkian eye for color and frame. Fassbinder consistently uses frames within the frame — windows, doorways, etc. — to underline the artificiality of melodrama; bright swaths of primary color only heighten the effect. As in the best of Sirk’s films, such self-consciousness draws the audience in rather than repulsing them — you sign a contract to play by the movie’s rules, and bind yourself to it.” – Sam Adams, Philadelphia City Paper

 

ROMAN HOLIDAY    7PM    At Coolidge Corner Theatre. 290 Harvard Street, Brookline MA 02446    1953    118 mins.    35mm

“William Wyler’s 1953 reverse-Cinderella story spends as much time exploring a European wonderland as it spends advancing its plot. Wyler lets much of the film pass without dialogue, allowing Hepburn’s immediate reactions (as enchantingly passionate now as they were 50 years ago, in what was her Hollywood debut) and her increasing physical closeness to Peck say what the characters can’t.” – Noel Murray, The A.V. Club

 

PROVIDENCE    7PM    At Harvard Film Archive. 24 Quincy Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1977    110 mins.    35mm

“The film’s rich mental landscape is a good deal more universal, with everything from H.P. Lovecraft’s werewolves to a painted seaside backdrop providing the essential textures. Like all of Resnais’ best work, this is shot through with purposeful and lyrical enigmas, but the family profile that emerges is warm and penetrating, recalling the haunted Tyrones in Long Day’s Journey Into Night rather than the pieces of an abstract puzzle.” – Jonathan Rosenbaum, Chicago Reader

 

OTHELLO    9PM    At Brattle Theatre. 40 Brattle Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1952    90 mins.    DCP

See above.

 

WEDNESDAY, JULY 2 & THURSDAY, JULY 3

Jaws

JAWS     4:15PM, 7PM & 9:45PM     At Brattle Theatre. 40 Brattle Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1975    124 mins.    DCP

“The establishment of this tension between the implements with which men try to contain chaos and kill fear and the chaos and fear themselves is the most key to its success. Jaws is forever vital because it’s forever about how man will never be the master of his own destiny. The miracle of it, though, is that it gets better every time you see it. I have the movie memorized at this point; I can recite it like a favorite song. ” – Walter Chaw, Film Freak Central

 

SATURDAY, JULY 5

Muppets Take Manhattan

THE MUPPETS TAKE MANHATTAN    11:30AM    At Somerville Theatre. 55 Davis Square, Somerville MA 02144    1984    94 mins.    TBD

“The plot of your movie has been seen before. I doubt if that will come as news to you. The Muppets Take Manhattan is yet another retread of the reliable old formula in which somebody says ‘Hey, gang! Our senior class musical show is so good, I’ll bet we could be stars on Broadway!’ The fact that this plot is not original does not deter you, Kermit, nor should it. It’s still a good plot.” – Roger Ebert, Chicago Sun-Times

 

MONDAY JULY, 7

A Hard Day's Night

A HARD DAY’S NIGHT    7PM    At Coolidge Corner Theatre. 290 Harvard Street, Brookline MA 02446    1964    87 mins.    DCP

“Made on the fly to capitalize on The Beatles’ meteoric rise, Richard Lester’s joyous and innovative pseudo-documentary is also transparently promotional, a shrewdly calculated exercise in star manufacture. Yet even as it strings together the obligatory hit parade of singles and performance sequences, the film conveys an intensely liberated spirit, with fun interludes and digressions that make bubblegum out of the French New Wave.” – Scott Tobias, The A.V. Club

06/20/2014 – 06/26/2014

FRIDAY, JUNE 20

Dead Man

DEAD MAN    7:30PM    At Museum of Fine Arts. 465 Huntington Avenue, Boston MA 02115    1996    134 mins.    TBD

“The best movie of the dog days of the 20th century. Made in 1996, it might as well be a silent. You can read the whole film off its faces. The sense of an undiscovered West — a West that vanished before it could be incorporated into national myth. That’s all there on the train ride from Cleveland to the Pacific, some time after the Civil War, as the white passengers shift inexorably into barbarism.” – Greil Marcus, Salon

 

JE T’AIME, JE T’AIME    7PM    At Harvard Film Archive. 24 Quincy Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1968    91 mins.    35mm

“Alain Resnais takes dozens of interludes from one man’s life — images of everyday banality and commonplace delights — and arranges them non-chronologically. Those leaps add up to a cubistic portrait of a not especially remarkable man who becomes something more, not because of his commonplace life but because of the extraordinary manner in which his story emerges in its sweep and details, its simplicity and grandeur.” – Manohla Dargis, The New York Times

 

KILLER OF SHEEP    5:30PM    At Museum of Fine Arts. 465 Huntington Avenue, Boston MA 02115    1979    88 mins.    TBD

“A dollar really means something in Charles Burnett’s Killer of Sheep, a milestone of eloquent understatement that captures the daily life of have-nots as few movies have. Set in the post-riots Watts section of Los Angeles, where poverty comes in degrees, the film is a major landmark in American moviemaking: a vivid ballad for life as it was lived by people whom movie cameras could rarely seem to find.” – Wesley Morris, The Boston Globe

 

WET HOT AMERICAN SUMMER    11:59PM    At Coolidge Corner Theatre. 290 Harvard Street, Brookline MA 02446    2001    97 mins.    35mm

“Paying homage to risqué junk of the Meatballs ilk, it plays out like a low-rent hipster lark in the spirit of Soderbergh’s Ocean franchise: an invitation to kick it with groovesters on holiday as they hang out, pal around, and amuse themselves just this side of smug. The movie feels tossed off in the most appealing way, bobbing along like the cute, dim-witted nephew of Dazed and Confused.” – Nathan Lee, The Village Voice

 

VICTORY OF WOMEN    9PM    At Harvard Film Archive. 24 Quincy Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1949    96 mins.    35mm

“Easily one of the most fascinating of these hitherto unavailable Mizoguchi films is Victory of Women, an ardent, early post-war feminist film, a Japanese Adam’s Rib. For Mizoguchi the ‘woman’s victory’ means not only independence for his spunky heroine, but a life in which she does not live only for herself. Yet, Mizoguchi insists, without autonomy selflessness becomes mere self-sacrifice.” – Joan Mellen, The New York Times

 

CLERKS    3:30PM    At Museum of Fine Arts. 465 Huntington Avenue, Boston MA 02115    1994    92 mins.    TBD

“A buoyant, bleakly funny comedy chronicling a day’s worth of activity at two adjoining stores, Clerks is true to the slacker motif of mixing smart twentyish characters with precocious burnouts, throwing them together in an atmosphere of funny yet frustrating paralysis. Though nominally situated in New Jersey, this convenience store and video rental place are in spirit somewhere very near the end of the world.” – Janet Maslin, The New York Times

 

THE ROOM    11:59PM    At Coolidge Corner Theatre. 290 Harvard Street, Brookline MA 02446    2003    90 mins.    35mm

“Tommy Wiseau thrust his flexing naked ass into the psyches of cult-film lovers with a disturbing yet strangely hypnotic ferocity. He opened up the Pandora’s box of his warped imaginationand bats and ghosts and spiders and other creepy-crawlies of the psychological variety flew out with such insane force and intensity that a decade later, we as a culture are still asking, ‘What the fuck was that?’” – Nathan Rabin, The Dissolve

 

THE GOONIES    11:59PM    At Kendall Square Cinema. 1 Kendall Square, Cambridge MA 02139    1985   114 mins.    Digital Video

“Richard Donner’s 1985 adventure tale was executive produced and conceived by Steven Spielberg and it has every mark of a hack director striving to replicate Spielberg’s wide-eyed optimism.  The movie (which runs a punishing near-two hours, even without the octopus), is basically unwatchable without the sticky sheen of nostalgia. Personally, I’d rather sit through Adventures in Babysitting again.” – Sam Adams, Philadelphia City Paper

 

SATURDAY, JUNE 21

Serenity

SERENITY    11:59PM    At Coolidge Corner Theatre. 290 Harvard Street, Brookline MA 02446    2005    119 mins.    Digital Video

“Although watching the movie feels a bit like tuning into a television program just in time for the series finale (which, um, it sort of is), once you gather the plot threads, Serenity reveals itself as a goofy interstellar Wagon Train — with a ragtag band of space cowpokes engaging in the kind of rapid-fire banter and foolish derring-do sorely missing from the recent Star Wars prequels. Everybody quips like Han Solo.” – Sean Burns, Philadelphia Weekly

 

PRINCESS YANG KWEI-FEI    7PM    At Harvard Film Archive. 24 Quincy Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1955    98 mins.    35mm

“Mizoguchi’s incisive sense of historical analysis is equalled by his exaltation of love and his recognition of the disproportionate price that women pay for pleasure and position. As injustice begets injustice and a corrupt regime besmirches beauty, Mizoguchi gives his lovers the last laugh, in one of the most jubilantly derisive endings in the history of cinema.” –  Richard Brody, The New Yorker

 

PI    3:30PM    At Museum of Fine Arts. 465 Huntington Avenue, Boston MA 02115    1998    84 mins.    TBD

“This is very much a first feature, with all the hyperbolic, sometimes indiscriminate cinematic energy of a student film. But it’s also sensational, a febrile meditation on the mathematics of existence. With its echoes of Jorge Luis Borges and Stanley Kubrick, even Frank Henenlotter’s great splatter flick Brain Damage, the whole movie is so hyper-alert that it seems pitched on the verge of a stroke.” – David Edelstein, Slate

 

DEAD MAN    10:30AM    At Museum of Fine Arts. 465 Huntington Avenue, Boston MA 02115    1996    134 mins.    TBD

See above.

 

KILLER OF SHEEP    1:30PM    At Museum of Fine Arts. 465 Huntington Avenue, Boston MA 02115    1979    88 mins.    TBD

See above.

 

WET HOT AMERICAN SUMMER    11:59PM    At Coolidge Corner Theatre. 290 Harvard Street, Brookline MA 02446    2001    97 mins.    35mm

See above.

 

THE GOONIES    11:59PM    At Kendall Square Cinema. 1 Kendall Square, Cambridge MA 02139    1985   114 mins.    Digital Video

See above.

 

SUNDAY, JUNE 22

The War Is Over

THE WAR IS OVER    7PM    At Harvard Film Archive. 24 Quincy Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1966    121 mins.    35mm

“Alain Resnais’ The War Is Over is exactly about the political dilemma of our time. This seems to be an age when the old and the young cannot agree on what is good or bad. The old (say the young) cling to outworn slogans and are worn down by centralization and bureaucracy. The young (say the old) care nothing for traditional values and seek to destroy society by anarchy.” – Roger Ebert, Chicago Sun-Times

 

THE LOVE OF SUMAKO, THE ACTRESS    5PM    At Harvard Film Archive. 24 Quincy Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1947    95 mins.    16mm

“I wonder if Mizoguchi lost a bet and was forced by his creditor to put his camera ten feet further back than he wanted. In this perversely stylized film, Mizoguchi will shoot theatrical scenes from the very back row, often from behind spectators’ heads, so that the spectacle of Kinuya Tanaka doing Ibsen is but a speckle on the screen. This is Mizoguchi’s master-shot scroll-painting style at its most severe.” – Ryan Wu, Pigs And Battleships

 

PI    3PM    At Museum of Fine Arts. 465 Huntington Avenue, Boston MA 02115    1998    84 mins.    TBD

See above.

 

MONDAY, JUNE 23

ON THE WATERFRONT    7PM    At Coolidge Corner Theatre. 290 Harvard Street, Brookline MA 02446    1954    108 mins.    35mm

“Thanks to Brando this posthumous Popular Front classic is a heart-clutcher from beginning to end. The greatest and most influential actor of post-war Hollywood, Brando would here redefine movie stardom with the eloquence of his strangled inarticulation. The scene of scenes, in which Terry reproaches his smarter brother for selling him out, is the most triumphant expression of failure in American movies.” – J. Hoberman, The Village Voice

 

THE WOMAN OF THE RUMOR    7PM    At Harvard Film Archive. 24 Quincy Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1954    83 mins.    35mm

“There are certain inevitabilities of narrative convention here, that Yukiko and Matoba’s relationship will blossom into romance and that Yukiko’s hostility to her mother’s line of work will mellow, but the first of these does not ultimately play out as expected and the latter develops logically as a result of, and in tandem with, the rediscovery by Yukiko of her own humanity.” – Slarek, CineOutsider

 

06/13/2014 – 06/19/2014

FRIDAY, JUNE 13

Friday The 13th VI

FRIDAY THE 13TH PART VI: JASON LIVES    11:59PM    At Coolidge Corner Theatre. 290 Harvard Street, Brookline MA 02446    1986    86 mins.    35mm

“The murderous Jason is back in the latest chapter of the most offensive series in film history, unless Burt Reynolds makes three more Smokey and the Bandit pictures real quick. This time the silent killer, still wearing a hockey mask, is dug up from his grave and rejuvenated by lightning. Jason attacks young camp counselors with his favorite carving knife. Of course he’s done that before and before and before and before and before.” – Gene Siskel, Chicago Tribune

 

MISS OYU    7PM    At Harvard Film Archive. 24 Quincy Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1951    95 mins.    35mm

“In this instance, Mizoguchi stages every scene as if it were meant for the theatre rather than the big screen (the post childbirth La Bohème sequence is as moving as it is reverential: just switch the kimono for Mimi’s shawl in mind’s eye) that lets these desperate characters arrive at their destiny with more show than tell. The best shot of the film places Oyû between the loveless couple, who, like bookends, gaze away to their respective wings.” – S. James Wegg, JWR

 

MY LOVE BURNS    9PM    At Harvard Film Archive. 24 Quincy Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1949    96 mins.    35mm

“Kenji Mizoguchi, furious and delicate, on the limits of enlightenment — rallies and debates aren’t enough when liberation isn’t extended to both sexes, every woman must start her own personal revolution. Spiritual and literal flames for Mizoguchi, who expands the Guernica note from Women on the Night in a severe account of the private upheavals that shape history more than treaties and parades.” – Fernando F. Croce, CinePassion

 

THE NEVERENDING STORY    11:59PM    At Kendall Square Cinema. 1 Kendall Square, Cambridge MA 02139    1984   102 mins.    Digital Video

“A graceless, humorless fantasy for children. Is it possible for Nowhere to be destroyed by Nothing? The child who can grasp this concept should be immediately packed off to the Sorbonne. When the movie is not sounding like The Pre-Teenager’s Guide to Existentialism, it’s simply a series of resolutely unexciting encounters between Atreyu and the creatures that alternately help and hinder his mission.” – Vincent Canby, The New York Times

 

SATURDAY, JUNE 14

The 47 Ronin

THE 47 RONIN    7PM    At Harvard Film Archive. 24 Quincy Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1941    241 mins.    35mm

“Mizoguchi brings the tale to life with a visual style as grandly expressive and as perfect as any I’ve seen. He makes no concessions to his audience in this four-hour film with perhaps three close-ups. Piecing together long takes, some five minutes or more, Mizoguchi gives the film the architectural integrity of a great building, systematically integrating the blocking of characters, narrative events, and the camera movements.” – Fred Camper, Chicago Reader

 

FRIDAY THE 13TH PART VI: JASON LIVES    11:59PM    At Coolidge Corner Theatre. 290 Harvard Street, Brookline MA 02446    1986    86 mins.    35mm

See above.

 

THE NEVERENDING STORY    11:59PM    At Kendall Square Cinema. 1 Kendall Square, Cambridge MA 02139    1984   102 mins.    Digital Video

See above.

 

SUNDAY, JUNE 15

The shining

THE SHINING    1PM, 4PM & 7PM    At Brattle Theatre. 40 Brattle Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1980    142 mins.    35mm

“It is this elusive open-endedness that makes Kubrick’s film so strangely disturbing. The movie is not about ghosts but about madness and the energies it sets loose in an isolated situation primed to magnify them. But there is no way, within the film, to be sure with any confidence exactly what happens, or precisely how, or really why. Kubrick delivers this uncertainty in a film where the actors themselves vibrate with unease.” – Roger Ebert, The Great Movies

 

THE LADY OF MUSASHINO    5PM    At Harvard Film Archive. 24 Quincy Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1951    88 mins.    35mm

“With its rather insistent score and generally melodramatic tone, this exploration of (or perhaps lamentation about) the loosening of post-war Japanese morals – depicting a series of extra-marital affairs (both consummated and unconsummated) in the small hamlet of Musashino – proves to be, despite excellent performances and a quite breathtaking, symbolically rich final scene, a decidedly minor Mizoguchi.” – Iain Stott, The One-Line Review

 

THE CRUCIFIED LOVERS    7PM    At Harvard Film Archive. 24 Quincy Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1954    102 mins.    35mm

“Mizoguchi spends a good 40 minutes setting up the intricacies of the relationships and the social obligations intrinsic to this story before opening up the film considerably in its second half, where a series of set pieces to rival anything in his catalogue are constructed and contrasted with the intimacy of this mostly two-person narrative. Akira Kurosawa was also a fan, considering it Mizoguchi’s finest achievement.” – Jordan Cronk, PopMatters

 

MONDAY, JUNE 16

Hedwig

HEDWIG AND THE ANGRY INCH    7PM    At Coolidge Corner Theatre. 290 Harvard Street, Brookline MA 02446    2001    95 mins.    35mm

Hedwig ranks among the most pleasant socks to the head I received all year long. Because despite all the usual classic camp tropes — the you-go-girl bravado, the Farrah Fawcett flip-coifs, a transsexual dude belting out glam-rock songs — it’s a pissed-off soapbox rant, angry and yet still pleasingly absurd. Unlike your usual transvestite masterpiece, Hedwig is actually about something. And for that I’m grateful.” – Matt Prigge, Philadelphia Weekly

 

TALES OF THE TIARA CLAN    7PM    At Harvard Film Archive. 24 Quincy Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1955    108 mins.    16mm

“One of Kenji Mizoguchi’s most lavish productions, this chronicle of the rise of the samurai amidst the oppression of 12th century Japan is heavy on plot and crowd scenes, but strangely inert at the center. An effective, meaningful effort by most standards, it registers as a kowtow to prestige picture impulses when considering the singular achievements of Mizoguchi’s earlier works.” – Kevin B. Lee, The House Next Door

 

THURSDAY, JUNE 19

Clerks

CLERKS    5:30PM    At Museum of Fine Arts. 465 Huntington Avenue, Boston MA 02115    1994    92 mins.    TBD

“A buoyant, bleakly funny comedy chronicling a day’s worth of activity at two adjoining stores, Clerks is true to the slacker motif of mixing smart twentyish characters with precocious burnouts, throwing them together in an atmosphere of funny yet frustrating paralysis. Though nominally situated in New Jersey, this convenience store and video rental place are in spirit somewhere very near the end of the world.” – Janet Maslin, The New York Times

06/06/2014 – 06/12/2014

FRIDAY, JUNE 6

Manhattan

MANHATTAN    7:30PM    At Museum of Fine Arts. 465 Huntington Avenue, Boston MA 02115    1979    96 mins.    35mm

Manhattan is not just Woody Allen’s dream movie. Wistful as it is witty, it’s his dream of the movies. Allen’s most personal film, it enshrines everything from his morality to his milieu. Youth fades. Love never lasts. Everyone is forever trying to retrieve the past. Only the skyline remains. Allen’s subsequent attempts to recapture Manhattan have often been embarrassing, but he (and we) will always have this.” – J. Hoberman, The Village Voice

 

THE MAN WHO WASN’T THERE    5:00PM    At Museum of Fine Arts. 465 Huntington Avenue, Boston MA 02115    2001    116 mins.    35mm

The Man Who Wasn’t There skates across a thick layer of subtly suggested, richly realized themes, examining how movements in history, philosophy, science, and art inevitably situate themselves amongst tract houses, diners, and barbershops. The Coens create a world that draws no distinction between Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle and the moral confusion of a dime-novel hero, a world that feels both familiar and strangely true.” – Keith Phipps, The A.V. Club

 

OSAKA ELEGY    7PM    At Harvard Film Archive. 24 Quincy Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1936    90 mins.    35mm

“One of Kenji Mizoguchi’s finest efforts. The narrative is precisely crafted, the characters’ conflicting goals and demands creating a trap from which no one can escape. Mizoguchi often films from a distance, and as his characters gradually shift their positions, long takes become visual metaphors for the network of connections between people; individualism is always isolating.” – Fred Camper, Chicago Reader

 

THE DOWNFALL OF OSEN    9PM    At Harvard Film Archive. 24 Quincy Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1935    87 mins.    35mm

“Mizoguchi’s key theme, and style, is humiliation: there is no private space, and as in Kafka, characters are always being watched and used even in their most private moments. Mizoguchi watches his cages from afar as the characters do in each other and then themselves. A prostitute is just a girl who turns a private act into a public one.” – David Phelps, MUBI

 

MULHOLLAND DRIVE    9:30PM    At Brattle Theatre. 40 Brattle Street, Cambridge MA 02138    2001    147 mins.    35mm

“The movie is hypnotic. We’re drawn along as if one thing leads to another–but nothing leads anywhere, and that’s even before the characters start to fracture and recombine like flesh caught in a kaleidoscope. This is a movie to surrender yourself to. If you require logic, see something else. Individual scenes play well by themselves, as they do in dreams, but they don’t connect in a way that makes sense–again, like dreams.” – Roger Ebert, Chicago Sun-Times

 

MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING    2:30PM    At Museum of Fine Arts. 465 Huntington Avenue, Boston MA 02115    2013    109 mins.    35mm

“Joss Whedon’s Much Ado About Nothing is just about the sloppiest Shakespeare ever put on the screen. It may also be the most exhilarating — a profound trifle that reminds you how close Shakespeare’s comedies verge on darkness before pirouetting back into the light. A black-and-white modern-dress version of the play, shot in 12 days at the director’s house, the film has the slapdash air of Mickey and Judy putting on a show in a barn.” – Ty Burr, The Boston Globe

 

THE HOLY MOUNTAIN    11:59PM    At Coolidge Corner Theatre. 290 Harvard Street, Brookline MA 02446    1973    115 mins.    35mm

“A scandal when first released, Mr. Jodorowsky’s movie is a dazzling, rambling, often incoherent satire on consumerism, militarism and the exploitation of third world cultures by the West. It unfurls like a hallucinogenic daydreamending with a postmodern punch line suggesting that movies are drugs too, and the revolution can’t happen until we kick our habits.” – Matt Zoller Seitz, The New York Times

 

THE BIG LEBOWSKI    11:59PM    At Kendall Square Cinema. 1 Kendall Square, Cambridge MA 02139    1998    119 mins.    Digital Video

“A cubist comedy concocted by the irrepressible Coen brothers out of bits and pieces of the old and the new, the black and the blue, the profound and the profane, in a portion of Los Angeles where hyper-reality collides with hyper-gaucherie. The result is a lot of laughs and a feeling of awe toward the craftsmanship involved. I doubt that there’ll be anything else like it the rest of this year.” – Andrew Sarris, The New York Observer

 

SATURDAY, JUNE 7

VERTIGO    12PM, 4:30PM, & 9:15PM    At Brattle Theatre. 40 Brattle Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1958    130 mins.    35mm

“One of the landmarks—not merely of the movies, but of 20th-century art. Alfred Hitchcock’s 1958 film extends the relationship of creator and creation into the realm of love and sexuality. The film’s dynamics parallel the artist’s struggle with his work. But a thematic analysis can only scratch the surface of this extraordinarily dense and commanding film, perhaps the most intensely personal movie to emerge from the Hollywood cinema.” – Dave Kehr, Chicago Reader

 

A GEISHA    7PM    At Harvard Film Archive. 24 Quincy Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1953    84 mins.    35mm

“It shares with the director’s period films the quality of being incredibly beautiful without being particularly, foolishly pretty. The charm is the compassionate but completely unsentimental way it regards the two women’s friendship. Though the landscape of the film is restricted to a small, rather exotic quarter in Kyoto, A Geisha is far from esoteric. The scope is narrow and the focus is deep.” – Vincent Canby, The New York Times

 

POPPY    9PM    At Harvard Film Archive. 24 Quincy Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1935    72 mins.    16mm

“Mizoguchi represents a delicately passé version of cinema. I have a hard time imagining a generation raised on CGI assimilating to his introverted rhythms and quietudes. But his material still stings. Most of the films are tragic diagrams of sexist inequity. There may not have ever been a more sincere maker of women’s melodramas in the history of film.” – Michael Atkinson, The Village Voice

 

MANHATTAN    12PM    At Museum of Fine Arts. 465 Huntington Avenue, Boston MA 02115    1979    96 mins.    35mm

See above.

 

THE MAN WHO WASN’T THERE    2:30PM    At Museum of Fine Arts. 465 Huntington Avenue, Boston MA 02115    2001    116 mins.    35mm

See above.

 

THE HOLY MOUNTAIN    11:59PM    At Coolidge Corner Theatre. 290 Harvard Street, Brookline MA 02446    1973    115 mins.    35mm

See above.

 

THE BIG LEBOWSKI    11:59PM    At Kendall Square Cinema. 1 Kendall Square, Cambridge MA 02139    1998    119 mins.    Digital Video

See above.

 

SUNDAY, JUNE 8

Jeanne Dielman

JEANNE DIELMAN, 23 QUAI DU COMMERCE, 1080 BRUXELLES    2PM & 8PM    At Brattle Theatre. 40 Brattle Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1975    201 mins.    35mm

“Akerman’s film just is, a life experience rather than a convenient story told. It’s not what you’d call a consciously pleasurable experience: the undulations of frustration, fascination, tedium, fury and epiphany you feel watching the movie are built in, part of the scheme, intrinsic to the point. But it’s as visceral as any horror movie. The climax is only a meaningful shock if you’ve been paying attention, and put in the hours.” – Michael Atkinson, IFC

 

ED WOOD    2:30PM    At Museum of Fine Arts. 465 Huntington Avenue, Boston MA 02115    1994    125 mins.    35mm

Raging Bull for starfuckers. A hagiography that’s as much critical analysis as homage, it engages in a conversation about how Wood’s films are seen at the same time that it endeavours to tell the highlights of Wood’s life. The result is a picture that bridges the gap between cult and camp classic; the melancholic and the melodramatic; and the difference between a director of vision and a director with a vision that sucks.” – Walter Chaw, Film Freak Central

 

THE NAVIGATOR    2PM    At Somerville Theatre. 55 Davis Square, Somerville MA 02144    1924    59 mins.    35mm

“Buster Keaton’s 1924 film is about a rich young couple cast adrift on a deserted ocean liner. The situation is perfectly suited to Keaton’s natural sense of surrealism—everything is too big, too full, and too much. Keaton and his girlfriend become two innocents lost in a threatening, mechanistic Eden, alone in their oversized world. A masterpiece, and very, very funny.” – Dave Kehr, Chicago Reader

 

PORTRAIT OF MADAME YUKI    7PM    At Harvard Film Archive. 24 Quincy Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1950    88 mins.    35mm

“The title echoes Portrait of Madame X, and Kenji Mizoguchi’s socialite is as detailed, evocative and mysterious as John Singer Sargent’s. Her aristocratic pavilion is a stifling maze of manicured gardens, winding trails and doors opening unto doors opening unto doors. The stunning dénouement points to Ugetsu’s spectral realms. Mist creeps in, and it’s as if Murnau had never died.” – Fernando F. Croce, CinePassion

 

OSAKA ELEGY    5PM    At Harvard Film Archive. 24 Quincy Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1936    90 mins.    35mm

See above.

 

MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING    12PM    At Museum of Fine Arts. 465 Huntington Avenue, Boston MA 02115    2013    109 mins.    35mm

See above.

 

MONDAY, JUNE 9

Boyz N The Hood

BOYZ N THE HOOD    7PM    At Coolidge Corner Theatre. 290 Harvard Street, Brookline MA 02446    1991    112 mins.    35mm

“The film is at times violent, but is first and foremost about the relationship between a teenager and the wise father trying to set him straight. Columbia Pictures cut a trailer for the film, and the result made Boyz N The Hood look like Assault On Precinct 13. Filmgoers expecting to see wall-to-wall violence were confused. This was no exploitation quickie. There was more violence going at movie theaters and malls.” – Odie Henderson, Big Media Vandalism

 

THE LIFE OF OHARU    7PM    At Harvard Film Archive. 24 Quincy Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1952    136 mins.    35mm

“The more obscure and spiritually complete The Life of Oharu represents the Holy Grail of Japanese cinema. Devastating from beginning to end, its genius is not so much Mizoguchi’s caustic criticism of a money-obsessed society’s refusal to acknowledge its accountability for Oharu’s degradation, but that Mizoguchi uses her life to peel back the layers of the physical self and reveal the soul that lies bruised beneath.” – Ed Gonzalez, Slant Magazine

 

MULHOLLAND DRIVE    8PM    At Brattle Theatre. 40 Brattle Street, Cambridge MA 02138    2001    147 mins.    35mm

See above.

 

TUESDAY, JUNE 10

Meeks Cutoff

MEEK’S CUTOFF    7:30PM & 9:30PM    At Brattle Theatre. 40 Brattle Street, Cambridge MA 02138    2010    104 mins.    35mm

“Reichardt’s film is muted, severe and hardly an audience-friendly experience. It’s another one of those art movies that critics like because nothing happens. I was hypnotized from the opening sequence. Meek’s Cutoff is about the day-to-day grind, mundane tasks and the sick, helpless feeling of not knowing where you’re going. When the movie was over, I had to go walk it off for a little while before I felt like talking to anybody.” – Sean Burns, Philadelphia Weekly

 

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 11

Pickpocket

PICKPOCKET    7:30PM & 9:15PM    At Brattle Theatre. 40 Brattle Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1959    75 mins.    35mm

“I adore Pickpocket and can watch it endlessly. To me it’s as close to perfect as there can be. Pickpocket gave me the courage to write Taxi Driver, and from that point on I have never had a problem with characters that appear beyond empathy. Bresson taught me I could take an outcast, a lonely man, a guy who lives an interior life, and say: ‘Let’s walk in his shoes.’” – Paul Schrader, The Telegraph

 

THURSDAY, JUNE 12

Rashomon

RASHOMON    7:30PM & 9:30PM    At Brattle Theatre. 40 Brattle Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1950    88 mins.    35mm

“Like a lot of the really popular ‘foreign films’ released before loose European sex became the dominating attraction, Rashomon is a Thesis Film, setting out to prove an inconvenient truth, namely: that truth itself is unknowable, relying as it does on the various whims and prejudices of its entirely too human tellers. A sublimely well-made bit of obviousness, it’s gripping because it’s directed with the zeal of a boy’s adventure.” - Matt Prigge, Philadelphia Weekly

 

ED WOOD    4:30PM    At Museum of Fine Arts. 465 Huntington Avenue, Boston MA 02115    1994    125 mins.    35mm

See above.

05/30/2014 – 06/05/2014

FRIDAY, MAY 30

The Cook The Thief

THE COOK, THE THIEF, HIS WIFE, AND HER LOVER    9:45PM    At Brattle Theatre. 40 Brattle Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1989    124 mins.    35mm

“It is uncompromised in every single shot from beginning to end. Why is it so extreme? Because it is a film made in rage, and rage cannot be modulated. Those who think it is only about gluttony, lust, barbarism and bad table manners will have to think again. It is a film that uses the most basic strengths and weaknesses of the human body as a way of giving physical form to the corruption of the human soul.” – Roger Ebert, Chicago Sun-Times

 

DR. STRANGELOVE OR HOW I LEARNED TO STOP WORRYING AND LOVE THE BOMB    5:30 & 7:30PM    At Brattle Theatre. 40 Brattle Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1964    95 mins.    TBD

“It is by now a legendary anecdote: Stanley Kubrick began adapting Peter George’s dead-serious nuclear thriller Two Hours to Doom and, suddenly struck by the ridiculousness of it all, transformed it into his seminal nightmare satire. The similarities—and, naturally, the differences—offer a telling look at why Strangelove refuses to age, why its ability to provoke simultaneous laughter and terror remains undiminished.” – Bilge Ebiri, Moving Image Source

 

THE MUSIC MAN    4PM    At Museum of Fine Arts. 465 Huntington Avenue, Boston MA 02115    1962    151 mins.    35mm

“The rich, ripe roundness of it, the lush amalgam of the many elements of successful American show business that Mr. Willson brought together on the stage, has been preserved and appropriately made rounder and richer through the magnitude of film. The candid naïveté of the whole thing may disgust some sophisticates, but it is sure to delight the general audience.” – Bosley Crowther, The New York Times

 

MARY POPPINS    7PM    At Museum of Fine Arts. 465 Huntington Avenue, Boston MA 02115    1964    139 mins.    DCP

“Mary Poppins is kind of hot. Nobody wants to get to an age where you start to think a nanny from an old Disney movie is kind of hot, but it happens to the best of us. And she had those little hats and a talking umbrella and shit. I know a lot of men are intimidated by women who are more capable than them, but I would not be against dating somebody who can fly and sit on a cloud.” – Outlaw Vern, The Life And Art Of Vern

 

BROADWAY BILL    7PM    At Harvard Film Archive. 24 Quincy Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1934    103 mins.    35mm

“Not exactly a lost film or an uncovered masterpiece, but still a pretty good indication of what Frank Capra could do during his prime. Made shortly after the runaway success of It Happened One Night, but before the ‘little man’ bromides of Mr. Deeds and Mr. Smith took over, this horse-racing comedy drama is a damned sight better than Riding High, the lugubrious 1950 remake with Bing Crosby.” – Jonathan Rosenbaum, Chicago Reader

 

RIDING HIGH    9PM    At Harvard Film Archive. 24 Quincy Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1950    112 mins.    35mm

“A genial and jovial entertainment that ties the original. Mr. Crosby has not been so fortunate in a role since Going My WayIndeed, with respect and affection for the sixteen-year-old Broadway Bill, we might even stretch an estimation and say that Riding High beats it by a nose—or rather, by Mr. Crosby’s casual and gay personality, which leaps to the front at the barrier and paces the picture all the way.” – Bosley Crowther, The New York Times

 

ALIEN: THE DIRECTOR’S CUT    11:59PM    At Kendall Square Cinema. 1 Kendall Square, Cambridge MA 02139    2003    117 mins.    Digital Video

“Unlike its increasingly baroque series of sequels, Ridley Scott’s original 1979 Alien is a film about human loneliness amid the emptiness and amorality of creation. It’s a cynical ’70s-leftist vision of the future in which none of the problems plaguing 20th century Earth — class divisions, capitalist exploitation, the subjugation of humanity to technology — have been improved in the slightest by mankind’s forays into outer space.” – Andrew O’Hehir, Salon

 

EL TOPO    11:59PM    At Coolidge Corner Theatre. 290 Harvard Street, Brookline MA 02446    1979    107 mins.   35mm

“If you squint your eyes, it’s a brutal spaghetti western featuring homicidal bandito rapists howling with laughter and the mysterious anti-hero who inevitably rids them of gallons of their own fire-engine red marinara. Now open your peepers, drop a tab of LSD in each, and maybe you’ll be ready to find enlightenment in the rest of Jodorowsky’s pseudo-linear dreamscape, which dips its imagery in a bloodbath of groovy tarot psychedelia.” – Aaron Hillis, The Reeler

 

SATURDAY, MAY 31

BAtman

BATMAN    4:45PM & 9:30PM    At Brattle Theatre. 40 Brattle Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1989    126 mins.    35mm

“Burton is a post-literate who cares very little about script and very much about visual expressionism.  He tells the story in unforgettable images. In terms of acting – which is even more superlative, if possible, than the art direction - Batman is a movie about eyebrows. While Batman’s forehead is quizzical with its horizontal question marks, The Joker’s brow teems with killer caterpillars. It’s a hilarious, graphic touch.” – Carrie Rickey, Philadelphia Inquirer

 

THE LIFE OF OHARU    7PM    At Harvard Film Archive. 24 Quincy Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1952    136 mins.    35mm

“The more obscure and spiritually complete The Life of Oharu represents the Holy Grail of Japanese cinema. Devastating from beginning to end, its genius is not so much Mizoguchi’s caustic criticism of a money-obsessed society’s refusal to acknowledge its accountability for Oharu’s degradation, but that Mizoguchi uses her life to peel back the layers of the physical self and reveal the soul that lies bruised beneath.” – Ed Gonzalez, Slant Magazine

 

BABES IN ARMS    12:30PM    At Brattle Theatre. 40 Brattle Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1939    94 mins.    35mm

“It was a vindication for Berkeley, who proved he could change with the times and create a hit even without his signature production numbers. Mickey Rooney was nominated for an Oscar for his part, which the actor later said ‘may have been the best picture I ever made.’ Judy Garland was awarded a special Oscar that year ‘for her outstanding performance as a screen juvenile for the past year.’” – Stephanie Thames, Turner Classic Movies

 

GOLDFINGER    2:30PM & 7:15PM    At Brattle Theatre. 40 Brattle Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1964    110 mins.    DCP

“With Ian Fleming’s hero we can escape into a super-cynical world of tough and materialistic romanticism: not identifying ourselves too closely with this intrepid and resourceful fellow for whom women and planes and evil bigwigs lie patiently in wait; but fellow-travelling with Mitty-ish pleasure and thanking our stars that we are not required to meet sinister Koreans with lethal hats at whose flinging all the world had better duck.” – Eric Shorter, The Telegraph

 

A STAR IS BORN    11AM    At Museum of Fine Arts. 465 Huntington Avenue, Boston MA 02115    1954    154 mins.    35mm

A Star is Born is a tragedy. Not only for obvious reasons intra- and extratextual, but for its ability to capture the drudgery of machine-tooled Hollywood at the height of the studio era as it turned to face the threat of television, and the collateral of careers and dreams this transition left in its wake. It’s a glorious mess, unwieldy and top-heavy. But once you see it, you’ll be thinking about it for days.” – Walter Chaw, Film Freak Central

 

THE WIZARD OF OZ    2:30PM    At Museum of Fine Arts. 465 Huntington Avenue, Boston MA 02115    1939    102 mins.    35mm

“Years later, I can now see that the terror instilled in me as a child by repeated viewings of The Wizard of Oz drove me to become a film critic. Was I the only one who had nightmares about  the Winged Monkeys, their formations filling the sky like a cross between Goya’s Sleep of Reason and the Luftwaffe? Or the appalling realization that one’s entire experience, in living color yet, might be no more than a dream?” – Peter Keough, The Boston Phoenix

 

ALIEN: THE DIRECTOR’S CUT    11:59PM    At Kendall Square Cinema. 1 Kendall Square, Cambridge MA 02139    2003    117 mins.    Digital Video

See above.

 

EL TOPO    11:59PM    At Coolidge Corner Theatre. 290 Harvard Street, Brookline MA 02446    1979    107 mins.   35mm

See above.

 

SUNDAY, JUNE 1

Umbrellas

THE UMBRELLAS OF CHERBOURG    5:15PM & 9:15PM    At Brattle Theatre. 40 Brattle Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1964    91 mins.    DCP

It is one of the most beautiful things committed to celluloid, and as it often is with Demy, deceptively simple, while being actively, yet cat-foot quietly sad. This film confirms my worst fears about love. There’s no such thing as a Great love, or else, it doesn’t last; time obscures feelings and memories and what was once indelible becomes lost in a weed-molested corner of the mind.” – Veronika Ferdman, The House Next Door

 

THE RULES OF THE GAME    3PM & 7PM    At Brattle Theatre. 40 Brattle Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1939    110 mins.    35mm

“Renoir’s contempt for these rotten, insular aristocrats gets its strongest workout in the famed hunting sequence, when wild rabbits and pheasants are driven out into the open and slaughtered for sport. He once said later that none of these people are worth saving, but The Rules Of The Game isn’t the pheasant shoot that Renoir suggests: Its characters aren’t without depth or feeling, and they’re not incapable of love.” – Scott Tobias, The A.V. Club

 

WOMEN OF THE NIGHT    5PM    At Harvard Film Archive. 24 Quincy Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1948    75 mins.    35mm

“History hardly changes. The difference between medieval feudalism and modern-day capitalism, throughout Mizoguchi’s films, is the difference between women who are subjected to humiliation, and women, in useless attempts to pay the bills, who willingly submit themselves to it. History is the story of rape victims becoming prostitutes. It’s also the story of Women of the Night.” – David Phelps, MUBI Notebook

 

STRAITS OF LOVE AND HATE    7PM    At Harvard Film Archive. 24 Quincy Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1937    108 mins.    35mm

“I admire the daring formal devices, which more than compensate for any loss of close physical association with the characters. At times, we are placed almost as documentary fly on the wall observers looking past people in the foreground and characters with their backs turned. I’m also very taken with the smooth camera movement, the beauty of compositions, the lovely wintry settings, and the film’s quieter moments.” – Kenji, MUBI Notebook

 

SINGIN’ IN THE RAIN    11AM    At Museum of Fine Arts. 465 Huntington Avenue, Boston MA 02115    1952    103 mins.    35mm

Faced with the unenviable task of building a movie around Brown and Freed’s dated songs, Comden and Green hit upon the idea of making the film a nostalgic period piece, a move that allowed them to gently send up the songs’ Tin Pan Alley corniness while reveling in their simple power. Singin’ In The Rain inventively satirizes the illusions of the filmmaking process while celebrating their life-affirming joy.” – Nathan Rabin, The A.V. Club

 

AN AMERICAN IN PARIS    1:30PM    At Museum of Fine Arts. 465 Huntington Avenue, Boston MA 02115    1951    113 mins.    35mm

“The picture takes on its glow of magic when Miss Caron is on the screen. Why this should be is fairly obvious. Miss Caron is not a beauteous thing, in the sense of classic features, but she has a sweet face and a most delightful smile. Furthermore, she has winsomeness, expression and youthful dignity—and she can dance like a gossamer wood-sprite on the edge of a petal at dawn.” – Bosley Crowther, The New York Times

 

BABES IN ARMS    12:30PM    At Brattle Theatre. 40 Brattle Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1939    94 mins.    35mm

See above.

 

MONDAY, JUNE 2

Do The Right Thing 4

DO THE RIGHT THING    7PM    At Brattle Theatre. 40 Brattle Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1989    120 mins.    DCP

“Incidentally, my rowdy audience at Do The Right Thing did not cheer the riot, nor did one break out at the end. Like me, they left having seen a reflection of their own lives onscreen. It was a sad, angry and bittersweet reflection, but we were happy to be able to look in the mirror. And the 1989 movie that should have caused a riot was Driving Miss Daisy, which reminded me and others like me just how Hollywood likes their Negroes.” – Odie Henderson, Movie Mezzanine

 

SEX, LIES, AND VIDEOTAPE    5PM & 9:30PM    At Brattle Theatre. 40 Brattle Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1989    87 mins.    35mm

“This is not an ‘adult film’ in the X-rated sense; it is an adult film, patient and subtle. What amazes is that at just 26, Soderbergh displays the three qualities associated with mature filmmakers: a unique authorial voice, a spooky camera assurance, and the easy control of ensemble acting. Soderbergh delivers so much and promises even more.” - Richard Corliss, Time Magazine

 

LOST HORIZON    7PM    At Harvard Film Archive. 24 Quincy Street, Cambridge MA 02138    1937    132 mins.    35mm

With wind machines, snow machines, and back-projection machines we conjured up the Arctic rigors of the Himalayas. The snow the actors crunched through was snow. The breath-showing puzzle—ludicrously ‘solved’ once by dry ice in actor’s mouths—was cracked by an ice house. The key to misty breath, red noses, and frosty eyebrows was so obvious it had been overlooked. Lower the temperature, fool.” – Frank Capra, The Name Above The Title

 

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 4

Lenny

LENNY    4:30PM    At Museum of Fine Arts. 465 Huntington Avenue, Boston MA 02115    1974    111 mins.    35mm

“If Lenny is a tragedy, it’s because Lenny Bruce couldn’t separate his artistic, legal, emotional, and physical problems, and the film doesn’t necessarily suggest that he should have tried. All that’s clear in the film is that Lenny was in an impossible bind. Comedy is hard, but, by the end of his career, Lenny Bruce was no longer even trying to be funny.” – Bob Westal, The House Next Door

 

RAGING BULL    7PM    At Museum of Fine Arts. 465 Huntington Avenue, Boston MA 02115    1980    129 mins.    35mm

“Couched in images and sounds that are kinetic and visceral, closer to poetry than pulp, the film is a perfect match of form and content. Its sculptural weight can only be appreciated on the big screen. Scorsese has never again treated the history of a form, a medium, and a culture so radically, or made so complicated a meditation on the relations among spectacle, entertainment, and art.” – Amy Taubin, The Village Voice

 

THURSDAY, JUNE 5

Raging Bull 3

RAGING BULL    4PM    At Museum of Fine Arts. 465 Huntington Avenue, Boston MA 02115    1980    129 mins.    35mm

See above.

 

LENNY    7PM    At Museum of Fine Arts. 465 Huntington Avenue, Boston MA 02115    1974    111 mins.    35mm

See above.